manhattan_skyline_nite

The Signal Podcast

For the past several months my friend Jill Duffy and I have been developing a podcast. On Sunday we recorded and released the pilot episode of The Signal, a discussion show about news, technology, and culture.

We put a lot of thought and consideration in to what The Signal podcast could be, and we cycled through various formats. We settled on a (reasonably) succinct weekly discussion show about the news. We will produce an initial season of four or five episodes, then take a small break to assess what works and what does not. Episodes will focus a newsworthy topic, run for approximately one hour, and feature guests and interesting experts.

I have a long history with podcasting and am excited to co-produce a new show with a good friend. While podcasting has always been noisy and fun, I’m pleased to see it emerge as a unique and legitimate medium. The Signal approximates a hobby more than professional endeavor, and it will take many weeks to iron out the rough edges. As the name implies Jill and I would like the show to be interesting and useful, rather than blabby and rambly.

Episodes of The Signal will always be available for download here. The show is also on YouTube, Soundcloud, and soon iTunes.

Ping us any time. Because The Signal is a passion project, your feedback is particularly important. As the show evolves we’d love to hear from you and your thoughts about the news, suggestions for future topics, and critiques.

Thanks for listening.

hacking_jack_rice_dan_patterson

Hacking Explained: Jack Rice and Dan Patterson on Progressive AM 950


Download Audio

Jack and Dan discuss a brief history of hacking, explain how the NSA captured personal user data from major internet providers, and provide a few essential security tips for the web and mobile on Minnesota’s progressive talk station, AM 950.

Learn more about about the NSA from expert James Bamford, and security from host Steve Gibson.

Thanks for listening to Jack and Dan.

Stay tuned.

sudan_stories_airstrip

Sudan Stories with Jack Rice and Dan Patterson on Progressive AM 950

Recorded on AM 950 in Minneapolis as commentary on media training conducted by Small World News in Cairo, Egypt. 

Download Audio

jack_rice_dan_patterson_am950In which I join talk radio host, former CIA agent, and public defender Jack Rice to share stories on 950 AM in Minneapolis about storytelling, reporting from Cairo, and digital journalism in conflict regions.

Learn more at AM 950 Progressive Radio and on Jack’s website.

Thanks for listening.

سلام

Learn More:

Sudan Stories:

sudan_language_guns_phones

Sudan Stories: Language, Guns, & Phones – Media Training In Cairo

Recorded in March 2014 as part of a media training by Small World News in Cairo, Egypt. 

Download Audio

cairo_skylineFrom an ad-hoc classroom through the bustling streets of Cairo to the Pyramids of Giza, this is an audio journal of stories and  thoughts recorded while working with Small World News to train Sudanese media makers in March of 2014.

Our hotel was located down a busy, dusty ally in downtown Cairo. Each day our team scribbled on charts and whiteboards in a top-floor classroom with windows that opened to the noisy clanking of perpetual construction. For two weeks over coffee and sheesha with our Sudanese colleagues we used Android devices to review the techniques of telling stories that deeply resonate with people.

Our group was remarkable, and individually live fascinating lives in different regions of Sudan. Each day was an opportunity to learn more about family, music, language, and culture. With the help of great translators listened to personal stories, asked questions, and recorded audio. As with my prior trip to Sudan, I also occasionally recorded short audio journal entries of our activity. Far from an official report, this is a narrative that tries to capture the essence of the people of Sudan, as well as the sounds of Egypt.

cairo_antenna

In this episode you’ll hear a number of captivating stories:

  • The story of a mother awake in a storm anxiously awaiting the return of her son.
  • The impact of the Egyptian revolution on tourism at the Giza Pyramids.
  • The impact of violence and systemic marginalization on language, music, and dance in Kordofan.
  • How mobile phones are empowering disenfranchised groups.
  • The pop music of Sudan, Egypt, Eritrea, and Ethiopia.

cairo_roof

Notes: 

The experiences shared in this story are raw, unvettable, and sometimes shocking. Yet these experiences are shared by thousands of Sudanese  refugees and internally displaced persons. To learn more about systemic marginalization and the wars in Sudan, Kordofan, and Darfur please read Richard Cockett’s Sudan, Darfur, Islamism and the World.

The stories shared in this episode were conducted with a local, untrained translator and recorded on the fly with a Marantz PMD620. I speak Arabic poorly and did my best to keep up with the narrative, but surely much nuance and context was lost in translation. Arabic clarification and edits are welcome.

Thanks for listening.

سلام

Learn More:

Sudan Stories:

cairo_streets

story_of_n_blind

Sudan Stories: The Story of N – Imprisoned and Blinded

Recorded in March 2014 as part of a media training by Small World News in Cairo, Egypt. 

Download Audio


cairo_sunsetN is from a city in Sudan. I met her during our training course in Cairo. N was a media student for two weeks and I had to opportunity to know her well. In Sudan, N has a reputation as a hard-working and warm-hearted activist. Her loud voice was heard and noted by the UN and the international community, but was largely ignored by the Sudanese government. Until she witnessed corruption and spoke too loudly.

For the crime of witnessing and reporting corruption, N was imprisoned and kept in solitary confinement. She placed in a stark cell and kept alone for months. Her only company was the bright light that shone perpetually, keeping her awake for days at a time. From time to time she was removed from her cell and forced by her captors to stare in to a blinding light during brutal interrogations. 

Then, just prior to Ramadan for reasons still unknown, she was released. She’s worried about government surveillance, her family, and her safety. She wanted to learn to make media as a form of empowerment. Over coffee and cheap cigarettes N shared her story as we sat and looked at the Cairo sunset.

The experiences shared by N are raw, unvettable, and sometimes shocking. Yet N’s experience is shared by thousands of Sudanese  refugees and internally displaced persons. To learn more about systemic marginalization and the wars in Sudan, Kordofan, and Darfur please read Richard Cockett’s Sudan, Darfur, Islamism and the World.

Notes:

The experiences shared by N are raw, unvettable, and sometimes shocking. Yet N’s experience is shared by thousands of Sudanese  refugees and internally displaced persons. To learn more about systemic marginalization and the wars in Sudan, Kordofan, and Darfur please read Richard Cockett’s Sudan, Darfur, Islamism and the World.

This interview was conducted with a local, untrained translator and recorded on the fly with a Marantz PMD620. I speak Arabic poorly and did my best to keep up with the narrative, but surely much nuance and context was lost in translation. Arabic clarification and edits are welcome.

Thanks for listening.

سلام

Learn More:

Sudan Stories:

story_of_m_choice

Sudan Stories: The Story of M – Sell a Kidney or Make Bombs

Recorded in March 2014 as part of a media training by Small World News in Cairo, Egypt. 

Download Audio


sudan_thumbs_in_cairoM is a Sudanese activist living in Cairo. As a young man in Sudan M was kidnapped, forced to join the military, and punished for refusing to learn bomb-making tactics. Years later M was released and built a life in Sudan. Yet he was seized again and tortured by the government. He bribed his way to freedom, sold his house, and fled to Cairo. Now he’s running out of money. M faces a choice between selling a kidney and becoming a suicide bomber.

I was introduced to M by friends in our Sudanese training program. On the final day of training our translator tugged my sleeve while I was busy checking the encryption on a mobile device. M – shy, short, with a strong voice but sympathetic disposition and dressed in Western clothing – was was introduced as a Cairo resident friend of our group. M shared his story as we sat together on cracked brown couches in the bright, smoke-filled lobby of a small hotel in downtown Cairo.

Notes:

The experiences shared by M are raw, unvettable, and sometimes shocking. Yet M’s experience is shared by thousands of Sudanese  refugees and internally displaced persons. To learn more about systemic marginalization and the wars in Sudan, Kordofan, and Darfur please read Richard Cockett’s Sudan, Darfur, Islamism and the World.

This interview was conducted with a local, untrained translator and recorded on the fly with a Marantz PMD620. I speak Arabic poorly and did my best to keep up with the narrative, but surely much nuance and context was lost in translation. Arabic clarification and edits are welcome.

Thanks for listening.

سلام

Learn More:

Sudan Stories:

Featured Image -- 54021

The Redline: EP00 Pre-Pilot Demo: The State of News & Politics

Dan Patterson:

“Tighten the fuck up.” ‘Nuff said.

Originally posted on The Redline:

The Redline is getting closer to our inaugural season of episodes. We’ll launch with a limited run of 4 – 6 episodes. Each episode will contain news headlines, a topical discussion, and individual link picks. A few weeks ago Doc, Greg, and myself sat down to record a pre-pilot beta episode. While The Redline is an amateur and collaborative project, we’d like the final product to sound prepared and professional. We’re in no rush to launch an sloppy, low-quality show and rehearsal episodes have helped us figure out our content and personality flow.

Doc and I first collaborated on KBHU-FM, our college radio station. We practiced and worked hard, but were young, inexperienced, and far from ideal broadcasters. Even after we got the hang of radio hosting, after a solid talkset my radio mentor, Dave Diamond, used to phone the studio to let us know his thoughts. I have…

View original 130 more words

david_lloyd_hazarai_comic_con_13

Interview: Illustrator David Lloyd at NYC Comic Con


Illustrator David Lloyd talks with Dan Patterson at the Hazarai booth at NYC Comic Con 2013 about the ideological origins of his classic V For Vendetta, devising the iconic Guy Fawkes mask, and his ongoing anthology of great stories, Aces Weekly.

Learn more at Hazarai.com, and find more interviews like this at http://SoundCloud.com/DanPatterson.

Audio Enclosure

occupy_police_protest_large

Occupy Legacy: George Martinez on How the Protest Should Move Forward

A conversation about what the #Occupy movement means today, and what it needs to do to survive.

There’s a hint of nostalgia in crisp September air. As the fall leaves show the first signs age, police, who far outnumber a few singing and chanting protesters, form a continuous ring around lower-Manhattan’s Zuccotti park. Today, #S17, is the second anniversary of events that inspired a season of protest across the country.

Today’s gathering at Zuccotti park was a demographic cross-section of previous years. The morning hours included a smattering of college-age protesters, neo-hippies, musicians, gutter-punks, and union organizers marching between various downtown protests. The General Assembly, a semi-regular meeting conducted as a unified chorus of synchronized shouts, was smaller than previous years, but is still a great spectacle and example of organizational ingenuity. The protests were no more rowdy than in the past, and the police I spoke with all agreed that in spite of a few arrests earlier in the week most demonstrators remained peaceful.

(more…)

andy_bowers_slate_podcasts

The Gabfest: An Interview with Slate’s Podcast Chief Andy Bowers

In which Andy Bowers reveals the history of Slate podcasting, how he grew a content empire, and the true origin of Slate’s anti-Panda agenda.

The New Oxford American Dictionary deemed ‘podcast’ the word of the year in 2005. During the early, hyped days of podcasting and ‘web 2.0′, tech companies raised money at crazy valuations, and were poised to break semi-famous hosts in to the mainstream, finally replacing a generation of cheeseball radio DJ’s.

And then nothing happened. A medium ahead of it’s time, early podcasting fizzled as quickly as it popped. Consumers were uninspired and confused, and traditional news organizations couldn’t successfully shoehorn old advertising models on to niche and deeply-vertical content. Podcasting was largely abandoned by many of it’s early evangelists and common wisdom stated that video and YouTube had won.

After a career covering politics for NPR, Andy Bowers moved to public radio’s cultural cousin Slate in 2003, and began work podcasting in 2005. Instead of getting lost in the hype, Bowers focused on creating shows that simply reflected Slate’s sparky editorial vibe.

An opinion-driven news magazine, Slate’s contributors follow the same ethical standards of traditional news organizations, but are also encouraged to form and fight for opinions. The initial impetus behind Slate podcasts was to capture this opinion-creation process on tape, and record this behind-the-scenes editorial chatter in a live discussion environment.

The format is simple: commentators from cultural verticals – Sports, Culture, and Politics – gather weekly in a round-table environment to discuss topical news. Slate hosts know the audience well, and programs often emphasize nuanced discussion over shocking clickbait. Success is derived from a balance of consistency, integrated live-read advertising, and informed banter.

Tight focus on smart conversation has helped Slate hosts develop intimate relationships with large audiences. During a recent live episode of the Political Gabfest in New York City  fan and subscriber Stephen Colbert remarked on the personal bond between listeners and content, stating, “I’m so excited to be the fourth person at this little table.”

Andy Bowers’ strategy has worked. Slate programs grew slowly and consistently during podcasting’s post-hype years. Over the past decade, podcasting has matured organically. Like Slate, personalities like Marc Maron, Jesse Thorn, Kevin Smith, and Leo Laporte all leverage the the medium’s inherent intimacy to talk with large audiences. And Slate  has become a cultural proving ground for ambitious personalities, professional athletes, politicos, and fellow podcasters.

In conversation, Andy is as cool and consistent as his content strategy. He’s somehow managed to grow an innovative product by avoiding the hype  and hyperbole of technology. Listen, as we discuss his formula for success.

Audio Enclosure